Author Archives: Katrina Boone

The Black Teacher Pipeline Is Clogged by Decades of Discrimination. Here’s How to Fix It.

This post is part of a week-long series about educator and leader pipelines. Read the rest of the series here.

For too long, schools have subliminally communicated an insidious message to black students: careers in education are not for you. As student diversity grows, only 20 percent of teachers nationally are of color, and numbers of black educators are swiftly declining in large urban school districts. When students of color graduate from college, less than 20% of them hold degrees in education. Honestly, I’m not surprised: Why would an educated, successful black person choose to enter a profession that has demonstrated systematic racism toward them for more than sixty years?

It hasn’t always been this way. Before the landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education, black teachers taught black students in black schools. There were tens of thousands of black teachers and principals, particularly across the South. But when schools were integrated, a large portion of black educators lost their jobs (an issue which made it to the Supreme Court with Brooks v. Moberly in 1959). As schools became less segregated for children, the teaching profession became more so. This was no accident: school districts systematically excluded black teachers, firing them en masse after integration, setting them up for failure in newly-integrated schools, and, over time, hiring them at slower rates than their white peers.

While this history is little-known, it’s not shocking. The same racism that drove slavery and Jim Crow dictated that it would be impossible for black teachers to preside over classrooms that included white students. The thought of a black adult facilitating any child’s learning was, well, unthinkable.

Photo by Allison Shelley/The Verbatim Agency for American Education: Images of Teachers and Students in Action

Having a teacher of color as a classroom leader matters for all kids. It’s important that the education workforce looks like our nation’s student body, and recent research shows having a same-race teacher improves academic outcomes for black students. Moreover, all students report feeling more academically motivated, more supported, and more cared for by their teachers of color than by their white teachers.

Attracting black teachers is no simple task. Here are three ways states and districts might begin turning the tide against decades of discrimination and bias:

1. Codify equitable and inclusive hiring practices

Early in my own teaching career, I taught in a small, rural school district. At a meeting for new teachers, I asked the superintendent if she might connect me with other teachers of color in the district, as I had noticed that I was the only one at my school. She laughed uncomfortably, explaining “that people like that” didn’t apply for jobs in the district. Her response haunted me: she didn’t seem concerned by the dearth of diverse educators, and if there were a problem, it certainly wasn’t the district’s fault. Though there were a significant number of students of color in the schools she led, there was no ownership of the fact that teachers of color clearly found the district undesirable, and there was no urgency or sense of responsibility to change that situation.

The good news is that when districts make efforts to reduce discrimination and bias in their hiring practices, it works. A teacher desegregation court order enforced in Louisiana in 2010 not only reduced the “representation gap” between black students and black teachers, but also improved academic outcomes for black students.

It doesn’t have to take a court order to see results like these. Instead of lamenting the fact that black teachers don’t apply in their districts, or simply wishing that their teaching ranks were more diverse, districts could codify equitable and inclusive hiring practices that emphasize a bias toward teacher diversity. When possible, districts should commit to filling open teaching positions with qualified teachers of color until the racial composition of teachers mirrors the racial composition of students.

2. Remove the barriers to teaching that disproportionately affect people of color

For equitable and inclusive hiring practices to work, of course, districts need to have diverse teaching applicants. The problem is that barriers to entering the teaching profession disproportionately affect people of color. College is becoming increasingly expensive, and that burden rests more heavily on the shoulders of black and brown students than on their white peers. Further compounding the problem, teacher licensure exams are unfairly biased against potential teachers of color.

States might address this problem in a couple of ways — first, by offering full tuition reimbursement or student loan repayment for teachers of color who commit to teaching long-term. States might also consider approving more non-traditional routes to certification, like streamlining the pathway to teaching for paraeducators and other school-level, non-certified staff.

Suburban and rural districts, which are less likely to employ teachers of color and more likely to face overall teaching shortages, might consider more drastic measures, like teacher residencies to prepare diverse candidates, pay advances for recent college graduates, commuter subsidies, and leadership roles that recognize and leverage a teacher of color’s expertise.

3, Craft a new narrative around teaching for students of color

I don’t recall having a single same-race teacher before I went to college, and until then, I never considered the teaching profession as a potential career option. My childhood experiences told me that teachers aren’t black. Presumably, this is the case for many students of color.

Commonly mentioned strategies to ameliorate that problem are programs like Educators Rising, which seek to increase the number of “home-grown” teachers by inspiring and developing a passion for teaching at a young age. But for this effort to most effectively engage students of color, teachers of color must be working in schools and in these programs.

There are a myriad of reasons that students of color don’t go on to be teachers. The fact that they never had a teacher of color simply should not be one.

States and districts have an opportunity to craft a new narrative for the students of color they serve: that teaching is a profession not only open to them, but ideal for them. Education professions offer unparalleled opportunities to positively impact children, and for teachers of color, those opportunities are even more robust. By pairing an emphasis on community service and potential impact with fair hiring practices and financial incentives, states and districts might be able to turn the tide on decades of exclusionary practices toward teachers of color.

The pipeline for black teachers is dangerously narrow, clogged with decades of discrimination, bias, and apathy. That pipeline can and must be fixed, though, or states and districts risk negating their progress toward closing achievement gaps and improving learning and life outcomes for all students. Failing to attract teachers of color fails all children.

How an East Coast/West Coast Hip Hop Rivalry Helped Us Find Evaluation’s Middle Ground

Everyone loves a good rivalry. The Hatfields vs. the McCoys. Aaron Burr vs. Alexander Hamilton. Taylor Swift vs. Katy Perry.

As evaluators, we’re partial to Tupac vs. Biggie. For the better part of three decades, these rappers from opposing coasts have remained in the public eye, recently reemerging with the release of a television series about their unsolved murders. Interestingly, their conflict about artistry and record labels mirrors a conflict within evaluation’s own ranks around a controversial question:

Can advocacy be evaluated?

Images via Stanford University, Zennie Abraham, Takeshl, and Harvard University

On the East Coast, Harvard’s Julia Coffman acknowledges that evaluating advocacy can be challenging, thanks to the unique, difficult-to-measure goals that often accompany these efforts. Nevertheless, she contends, these challenges can be mitigated by the use of structured tools. By using a logic model to map activities, strategies, and outcomes, advocates can understand their efforts more deeply, make adjustments when needed, and, overall, reflect upon the advocacy process. This logic model, she claims, can then become the basis of an evaluation, and data collected on the model’s components can be used to evaluate whether the advocacy is effectively achieving its intended impact.

In contrast to the East Coast’s structured take, West Coast academics refer to advocacy as an “elusive craft.” In the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Steven Teles and Mark Schmitt note the ambiguous pace, trajectory, and impact related to the work of changing hearts and minds. Advocacy, they claim, isn’t a linear engagement, and it can’t be pinned down. Logic models, they claim, are “at best, loose guides,” and can even hold advocates back from adapting to the constantly changing landscape of their work. Instead of evaluating an organization’s success in achieving a planned course of action, Teles and Schmitt argue that advocates themselves should be evaluated on their ability to strategize and respond to fluctuating conditions.

Unsurprisingly, the “East Coast” couldn’t stand for this disrespect when the “West Coast” published their work. In the comment section of Teles and Schmitt’s article, the “East Coast” Coffman throws down that “the essay does not cite the wealth of existing work on this topic,” clearly referring to her own work. Teles and Schmitt push back, implying that existing evaluation tools are too complex and inaccessible and “somewhat limited in their acknowledgement of politics.” Them’s fighting words: the rivalry was born.

As that rivalry has festered, organizations in the education sector have been building their advocacy efforts, and their need for evidence about impact is a practical necessity, not an academic exercise. Advocacy organizations have limited resources and rely on funders interested in evidence-based results. Organizations also want data to fuel their own momentum toward achieving large-scale impact, so they need to understand which approaches work best, and why.  

A case in point: In 2015, The Collaborative for Student Success, a national nonprofit committed to high standards for all students, approached Bellwether with a hunch that the teacher advocates in their Teacher Champions fellowship were making a difference, but the Collaborative lacked the data to back this up.

Teacher Champions, with support from the Collaborative, were participating in key education policy conversations playing out in their states. For example, in states with hot debates about the value of high learning standards, several Teacher Champions created “Bring Your Legislator to School” programs, inviting local and state policymakers into their classrooms and into teacher planning meetings to see how high-quality, standards-driven instruction provided for engaging learning opportunities and facilitated collaborative planning.

But neither the Collaborative nor the teachers knew exactly how to capture the impact of this workWith Teacher Champions tailoring their advocacy efforts across 17 states, the fellowship required flexible tools that could be adapted to the varied contexts and approaches. Essentially, they needed an East Coast/West Coast compromise inspired by Tupac and Biggie and anchored by Coffman, Teles, and Schmitt. Continue reading