Tag Archives: affordable housing

#DemDebates: Another Nothingburger on Education?

Two members of Bellwether’s Policy & Evaluation team, Cara Jackson and Beth Tek, watched Wednesday’s debates for any mention of education. They didn’t get what they were looking for, but there’s still plenty to discuss. 

Beth Tek: I have to say, while I was disappointed about the lack of education-related talk during the Democratic debate last night, I’m also not surprised.

Cara Jackson: Yup, I’m guessing no one got education bingo. But several candidates did discuss social supports that impact children, such as child care, paid maternity leave, and housing.

stack of empty burger buns, photo by Marco Verch

Photo by Marco Verch

Beth: That’s true. Elizabeth Warren talked about childcare, universal pre-K, and the exploitative wages of childcare workers. And Andrew Yang mentioned the fact that close to 75% of school outcomes are determined by what happens to children at home.

Cara: Yes, we know that out-of-school factors explain much of the variation in student achievement. This has been demonstrated since the 1966 Equality of Educational Opportunity report by James Coleman and colleagues, and by more recent work too. 

And candidates rightly addressed housing policy, which directly impacts education policy! Tom Steyer commented that housing determines where your kids go to school. Warren noted that her housing plan includes 3.2 million new housing units for lower-income families and middle-class renters in communities with severe housing supply shortages. She aims to mitigate the long-term impacts of redlining, the segregation created by refusing loans to black families, which continues to impact neighborhoods, and by extension schools, to this day.  

There’s also evidence of long-term academic benefits for children from low-income families who attend universal pre-kindergarten programs, so the debate certainly had implications for education.

Beth: And it’s not like these candidates don’t have education plans! I would have liked to hear Warren talk about her proposed infusion of Title I funding. Schools could use that money to provide more wraparound supports for America’s students, which would go a long way to educate the “whole child.” We know that Millennials (approximately ages 24 to 38) and Generation Zers (currently in K-12 and early adulthood) are reporting the highest percentages of anxiety and depression of any age group. And schools are trying to do more to address and support mental health.

Cara: Yes! I’d love to see some of that additional funding used to ensure students have access to supportive, high-quality school counselors. We know that these supports could improve high school graduation and college attendance. Or we could provide incentives to push back high school start times, in keeping with research that suggests doing so would improve academic outcomes.

Beth: Exactly Cara! Let’s take what we know works and provide the resources needed to implement it. In addition to later start times for high schoolers, how about free breakfast and lunch for all students? Students who come from food insecure homes have a hard time focusing in school, and this leads to poor behavioral and academic outcomes. Free breakfast and lunch would remove this obstacle from their education.

Cara: I hope we’ll hear more about education in the December debate. Stay tuned!

D.C. Unveiling Affordable Teacher Housing Co-located with Charter Schools

UPDATE: So far I’ve only found one other example of a complex that includes both affordable teacher housing AND a charter school facility. My Bellwether colleague Kyndall Parker-Joseph alerted me to Teachers Village in Newark, NJ.

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In The Washington Post, Perry Stein writes about a new private apartment building in Washington, D.C. that will offer subsidized housing to city teachers:

The residential units are aimed at young teachers without families who are on the low end of the teacher pay scale. Building Hope wants the residences to serve as an incentive for top young teachers who might otherwise be dissuaded from accepting jobs in the District because of the city’s high cost of living.

The building, a converted Catholic dormitory and study space, will also house two charter schools. The whole complex is a project of the Charter School Incubator Initiative, which seeks to address the well-documented facilities challenges faced by charter schools.

Photo of former St. Paul's College via Google Maps

Photo of former St. Paul’s College via Google Maps

Could this be a model used elsewhere to attract educators to expensive cities while also addressing a critical challenge for charter schools? Similar efforts to create affordable rental units for teachers exist in high-cost cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco, but the merger of housing with a school building could be a first.