Tag Archives: business

Business Organizations Play a Key Role in Education Advocacy Post-COVID

Questions about when and how to reopen schools will have ripple effects for the business sector and broader economy. If schools cannot open at all, or open only part-time or for small groups of students on a rotating basis, adults cannot return to work. Without a workforce, businesses cannot reopen and the economy remains shuttered. As a result, the business community has an especially important role to play in current deliberations about whether and how to reopen schools.

Business advocacy organizations, such as chambers of commerce and business roundtables, are well-suited to engage in these deliberations. These organizations advocate on behalf of policies that ensure students gain the skills, knowledge, and experiences they need to be successful in the current and future economy. This can look like helping to pass legislation requiring computer science coursework or successfully advocating for legislation to improve access to industry-recognized credentials and work-based learning experiences. In light of the current pandemic, business advocacy organizations bring an important voice to the conversation about what schooling could and should look like in the near future.  

What makes these organizations well-suited to engage in these conversations? While there’s limited research examining how the most successful organizations work, my colleagues and I recently completed a report that uncovered three key strengths that the most successful have in common. 

First, business advocacy organizations have a deep understanding of the advocacy landscape in their state and understand how to bring diverse groups — such as Republicans and Democrats or business and labor — together for a common cause. In Washington State, for example, the Washington Roundtable coordinates the College Promise Coalition, which includes stakeholders from public and private two- and four-year colleges and universities, students, families, alumni, education advocates, education leaders, and business leaders. As part of its advocacy to improve enrollment and completion rates in the state’s postsecondary institutions, the coalition’s broad base demonstrated widespread support for the Workforce Education Investment Act, which ultimately passed. Coordinating community-wide efforts like these will be imperative as regions work to repair their business, economic, and education sectors in a post-COVID world.  Continue reading

Business Leaders Must Continue to Engage in Education Advocacy

The business and education sectors are feeling the effects of the coronavirus pandemic acutely. Among small businesses, 75% have applied for emergency relief from the federal government and nearly three in ten have reduced staff. About half report having less than one month cash on hand. At the same time, tens of thousands of schools are closed and uneven transitions to distance education suggest significant adverse effects on student learning.

That’s why, even as the business community struggles to keep its head above water, business leaders must continue to invest time and energy into supporting the best possible paths forward for students — our nation’s future employees, professionals, and entrepreneurs.

A strong education system is key to economic growth, something that will be a priority after this crisis. In addition to the vast research linking a population’s education to economic prosperity, it’s impossible to miss how the unemployment rate for high-school graduates is currently at least twice that for those who hold at least a bachelor’s degree. As policymakers think about economic recovery in the years ahead, they will benefit from the business community’s vantage point on the skills and knowledge students need to be successful.

cover of May 2020 bellwether report

National business groups like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce include education as a policy priority; other business organizations, like America Succeeds, focus exclusively on education issues. In recent years, these and other business efforts have lent their voice to the drive toward providing strong options for students after high school, including apprenticeships and industry certifications alongside four-year college degrees. But business associations have a long track record of engaging in essential education issues; they were an important part of the coalition advancing higher standards and accountability in the 1990s, which helped shine a light on vast inequities in the education system and created urgency for reform.

Today, with the learning trajectories of students in turmoil, the business community again has a stake in charting the path forward. Business advocacy organizations can help create space for innovative thinking and drive policy proposals for resources and programs tailored to the needs of their state. And they can impart skills, for instance convening school leaders who benefit from management training. In Washington State, Partnership for Learning and the Washington Roundtable have provided leadership training to high school principals.

The business community can also support the continuation of learning for high school students through apprenticeships and other work-based learning experiences, since the school year has been disrupted and postsecondary opportunities have been clouded by economic uncertainty. Colorado Succeeds, an affiliate of America Succeeds, helped establish a state policy that provides school districts and charter schools up to $1,000 per student who completes a qualified industry credential program, work-based learning experience, or relevant coursework.

Of course the business community shouldn’t be the sole voice in education, especially since the purpose of schooling is not just about ensuring future economic prosperity. We also rely on schools to shape upstanding community members and informed citizens. But the business community absolutely has interests aligned to the success of today’s students — its perspectives are legitimate and often valuable.

Educators and policymakers should ensure it has a seat at the table.