Tag Archives: parent expectations

Lessons for Policymakers from Frustrated Parents

Photo by Allison Shelley/The Verbatim Agency for EDUimages

As another challenging school year winds down, parents are starting to reflect on what worked well for their child, what didn’t work well, and what their child needs to succeed in the school year ahead. Nationwide polling of parents indicates that while many parents say they’re generally satisfied with their children’s school, most are also concerned about their children’s academic progress and emotional well-being. Polling helps build an understanding of important parts of this story, but more detailed, nuanced information is needed to answer deeper questions about why parents are concerned and how they would like education leaders and/or policymakers to respond.  

In New Solutions for Frustrated Parents: How Education Leaders Can Help, we’re joined by Juliet Squire and Andy Rotherham in an examination of data from online parent journals conducted by Benenson Strategy Group earlier this year with 35 parents from across the country who expressed some frustration with their children’s experience with schooling during the pandemic. While we caution against over-interpreting the lessons from such a small sample size, it does provide key insights into how parents think about their children’s education and what they want moving forward. 

Parents’ open-ended responses in the online journals provide more visibility into the specific pain points they encounter in K-12 schooling. For instance, parents identified challenges around a lack of communication from their child’s school or a lack of personalized education. The journals also provide insight into why parents may be hesitant to change their child’s educational setting, even though they have frustrations with their child’s current school. Parents expressed concerns about the many uncertainties involved in switching schools as well as identified barriers to making those changes such as cost or transportation.  

These insights should help policymakers and education leaders shape policy to respond to the needs of parents in this moment. Our report offers several recommendations:  

  • Work with parents to better understand their needs: Policymakers and education leaders must increase efforts to reach out to families to better understand their needs.  
  • Increase the number of educational options available to families: Policymakers should provide families with educational options both during and beyond the regular school day. These options, in addition to school choice, should include more flexible and supplemental learning options like after-school programs, tutoring, and summer activities.  
  • Inform families about educational options that could meet their child’s needs: Policymakers and advocates should redouble their efforts to provide families with clear, reliable information to better inform their education decision-making. 
  • Reduce barriers to access: Policymakers should work with parents to identify barriers to educational opportunities in their communities and tailor solutions to mitigate or eliminate them. 

Policymakers don’t have to start this work from square one — our report identifies organizations that are already making progress on these fronts. This includes A for Arizona’s work to reduce transportation barriers and National Parents Union’s work to amplify parent voices.   

By listening to, elevating, and supporting the priorities and needs of parents, policymakers and education leaders can ensure that kids across this country are able to get what they need to succeed in the upcoming school year and beyond.  

“I’d Better Bring Home An A”: The Power Of Parent Expectations

This week, Bellwether staff share their perspectives on family and parent engagement. Follow Ahead of the Heard from now until Friday for a series of blog posts that tackle common misconceptions about engaged parents, working with multilingual families, and more. Click here to read other posts in the series thus far.

 

It’s the beginning of the school year, and I’m already behind on my assignments — that is, the flurry of forms to fill out, orientations to attend, and Back-to-School nights to add to the calendar. As an education researcher, I applaud all the efforts to engage me in what’s going on at school — and I love hearing about what my kids are learning — but as a working parent of a middle schooler and a high schooler, I admit I groan a little trying to fit it all in.

Often, parent involvement gets framed as caregivers’ level of interaction with the school — coming to school events and volunteering with the PTA, for example. While such activities may present minor scheduling headaches for me, many caregivers face much bigger obstacles, including lack of childcare, language barriers, or working multiple jobs. Framing engagement around school-based activities can lead to the assumption that the parents who don’t appear, especially low-income parents, are apathetic about their children’s education.

But that assumption is off the mark. A parent or guardian can have a powerful impact on a child’s achievement even if they never set foot in the school. A 2013 meta-synthesis of research on parental involvement drives this point home: out of a wide variety of types of involvement explored in many different studies, parents’ expectations for academic achievement had the strongest impact on students’ academic performance.

A student I met once in a focus group at a large city high school made this point even more succinctly. When asked her thoughts on parent involvement during high school, she said emphatically: “My mom is working in another city right now, so she’s not at home. But I know I better bring home an A, or else!” Even though they were physically separated, her mother’s expectations for high achievement were a very real motivating factor.

Ultimately, a central goal of family engagement is to increase the alignment between home and school in support of each child’s education. One way to do that is by inviting caregivers to the school, but there are many other ways to provide families with the tools they need to champion learning at home. For school leaders and policymakers seeking to engage a wider range of families, below are several examples of strategies that empower parents and guardians to reinforce high expectations for academic achievement, even if they are not able to physically come to the school. Continue reading