Tag Archives: Washingtonian

Bellwether Is One of D.C.’s Best Places to Work

Bellwether Education Partners was just chosen as one of the 50 best places to work (find us on page 93) in the Washington, D.C. area by Washingtonian, the iconic lifestyle magazine. The publication releases its Great Places to Work list every two years and has, in the past, highlighted D.C.-based companies like NASA, Vox Media, and the Data Quality Campaign. A few years ago (more than I want to admit), Washingtonian put me on its list of “40 under 40” to watch on the Washington scene. That was a nice nod, but I can’t think of a better way to return to its pages than as part of an organization I helped launch. I’m pleased we’re being recognized for giving people a good place to work — after all, we spend a lot of our lives at work.

This year, nearly 200 companies applied for the title of Great Places To Work. Winners varied in size and sector, from big tech firms to lean nonprofits, like ours, employing anywhere from 11 to 8,000 people — we have about 60.

Winners were largely chosen by how employees rated things like pay and benefits, work/life balance, and their company’s commitment to charity and community. Bellwether scored at or above average on all categories (except the quality of our coffee, which currently sucks and isn’t especially environmentally responsible), including job satisfaction; feeling challenged, interested, and recognized in their work; and whether or not people on our team would recommend working at Bellwether to a friend. Our team also felt confident in Bellwether’s financial health, management structures, and professional development opportunities.

When we (the four co-founders) founded Bellwether in 2010, we put a premium on flexibility and working to results so our team could do their best work while making decisions that made sense for them and their families. “Live your life and get [stuff] done” was our informal motto. We also emphasized trust — trust that if we hired smart people, they’d make smart decisions about how to use their time, how to do the work, and how to improve Bellwether. That’s why we’re able to have a D.C. office but also lots of remote employees. This strategy also allows Bellwether to source the best talent in the country and our team members to, well, live their lives while getting stuff done. If you want the office experience, we have that. If you thrive with remote work, we have that, too, or a balance of the two (which is what I prefer).

That flexibility, trust, and convergence of identities, ideas, and geographies make us unique, give us a competitive edge, and make us one of the great places to work in Washington, D.C.

I hope you’ll join us in celebrating.